Language teaching, teaching languages at the French School

By Arthur - -
Language teaching, teaching languages at the French School Understanding, integrating and managing linguistic heterogeneity is an essential prerequisite for the pedagogical implementation of an appropriate language policy, especially in a French school abroad.

An organised welcome of students and their families is necessary: meeting around an initial linguistic assessment, setting up a partnership including for the family the need to accompany their children as a full member of the educational team.

The language policy is built beforehand on communication (information, explanation, help in steering families in what must be understood as a real project for their children).

The basic idea is to establish a special but strong relationship with new languages (French for non-French speakers; English for French speakers) that will put the student in a voluntary and active posture, which is essential for his adaptation and learning, most of which takes place in French at the Arthur Rimbaud French School.

System in place in primary school (nursery and elementary); secondary school (middle school and high school):

  • At nursery school, 21.5 / 25 hours are dedicated to learning in French and French language.

    Non-French-speaking students who are newcomers or beginners also benefit from FLE (French as a Foreign Language) support from the teacher specialised in this discipline.

  • English is taught at a rate of 3.5 / 25 hours per week, divided between LVE 1 (Modern Foreign Language 1) and CLIL / EMILE (Content and Language Integrated Learning), teaching English and in English to students.

    At the same time, an APC (Complementary Teaching Activity) LVE 1 English is being set up for French-speaking newcomer students.

  • At elementary school, 22 / 23 hours per week are dedicated to learning in French and French language.

    Non-French-speaking students who are newcomers or beginners benefit from FLE-FLSco (French as a Second Language - French as a Language of Schooling) support by the teacher specialised in this discipline.

    Creation of the French LVE 1 (1 hour / week) for non-French-speaking newcomers, strengthening the FLE- FLSco system. These students will join the English LVE1 at the latest on entering Grade 6.

  • English is taught at a rate of 3 / 25 hours per week, divided between LVE 1 (1 hour / week - even 2 in Grade 4 / CM1 and Grade 5 / CM2: +1 hour of reinforcement for newcomer or beginner Francophones) and CLIL (2 hours / week), i.e. teaching English and in English to students.

The development of CLIL is adapted to the needs of the Arthur Rimbaud primary school population.

CLIL, taught by a native speaker, provides French-speaking students with a rich and spontaneous exposure to the English language (varied disciplinary content) and allows non-French speakers to grasp part of the content of French programmes with greater ease and performance.

However, the support of French language learning requires constant attention and support. It is advisable to multiply as much as possible the entries and contacts to the French language and culture, which in fact only exist practically inside the establishment except for the partner Alliance Française to whom we address families seeking external help to better support their children.

  • At the secondary, middle and high school level, the modern languages studied live are:

- The LVE 1 English, 3 hours weekly / 3 groups of language communication activity ("competence groups")* (Grade 6-Grade 7); 2 groups of language communication activity* Grade 8 – Grade 9

- The LVE 2 Spanish from the Grade 7 onwards.

- LVE 3 can be chosen by the student in supplementary education from the Grade 10 high school class, via the National Centre for Distance Education (CNED: Centre National d'Enseignement à Distance).



* CECRL: Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (Cadre Européen Commun de Référence pour les Langues). EDUSCOL Web site.

FLE: French as a Second Language

FLSco: French as a Language of Schooling